Research

Published Research
Research in Social Psychology

Gender Differences in Law School Classroom Participation: The Key Role of Social Context

Authors: Sophie Trawalter, Molly Bishop Shadel, J.H. Verkerke

Even though women make up roughly half of the students enrolled in law school today, they do not take up roughly half of the speaking time in law school classes. We found that women, more than men, report backlash for speaking in class, and this difference affects their willingness to participate in the law school classroom.

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Published Research

Are Americans less likely to reply to emails from Black people relative to White people?

Authors: John Holbein, Ray Block, Jr., Charles Crabtree, J. Quin Monson

Although previous attempts have been made to measure everyday discrimination against African Americans, these approaches have been constrained by distinct methodological challenges. We present the results from an audit or correspondence study of a large-scale, nationally representative pool of the American public. We provide evidence that in simple day-to-day interactions, such as sending and responding to emails, the public discriminates against Black people. 

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Published Research
Research in Social Psychology

Anger Damns the Innocent

Authors: Gabrielle Adams, Katherine A. DeCelles, Holly S. Howe, Leslie K. John

False accusations permeate social life—from the mundane blaming of other people to more serious accusations of infidelity and workplace wrongdoing. Importantly, false accusations can have grave consequences, including broken relationships, job loss, and reputational damage.  In this article, we document an equally pernicious phenomenon—the misuse of anger as a cue to predict whether a suspect has been falsely accused.

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Working Paper

Keep the Kids Inside: Juvenile Curfews and Urban Gun Violence

Authors: Jennifer L. Doleac, Jillian B. Carr

Gun violence is an important problem across the United States. Due to limited data, it has been difficult to convincingly test the impacts of government policies on the quantity and geography of gunfire. This paper uses a new source of data on gunfire incidents, which does not suffer from selective underreporting common in other crime datasets, to measure the effects of juvenile curfews in Washington, DC.

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Published Research

What Lies Beneath? Minority Group Members’ Suspicion of Whites’ Egalitarian Motivation Predicts Responses to Whites’ Smiles

Authors: Sophie Trawalter, Jonathan W. Kunstman, Taylor Tuscherer, E. Paige Lloyd

Antiprejudice norms and attempts to conceal racial bias have made Whites’ positive treatment of racial minorities attributionally ambiguous. Although some minorities believe Whites’ positivity is genuine, others are suspicious of Whites’ motives and believe their kindness is primarily motivated by desires to avoid appearing prejudiced. 

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Published Research

Safety in Numbers: Why the Mere Physical Presence of Others Affects Risk‐taking Behaviors

Authors: Eileen Chou, Loran F. Nordgren

As social mammals, being in a group signals a state of relative security. Risk‐taking behavior in other social mammals formed the basis for our prediction that the mere physical presence of others, absent any social interaction, would create a psychological state of security that, in turn, would promote greater risk‐taking behavior.

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Published Research

Racial bias in pain assessment and treatment recommendations, and false beliefs about biological differences between blacks and whites

Authors: Sophie Trawalter, Kelly M. Hoffman, Jordan R. Axt, M. Norman Oliver

Black Americans are systematically undertreated for pain relative to white Americans. We examine whether this racial bias is related to false beliefs about biological differences between blacks and whites (e.g., “black people’s skin is thicker than white people’s skin”).

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Published Research

What Is Good Isn't Always Fair: On the Unintended Effects of Framing Diversity as Good

Authors: Sophie Trawalter, Sara Driskell, Martin Davidson

Many proponents of diversity stress that diversity is good—good for universities to further their educational missions and good for businesses, for hiring talent and generating financial returns to shareholders. In this work, we examined costs of framing diversity as good for organizations vs. fair; specifically, we examined whether framing diversity as good for organizations broadens people’s definitions of diversity and increases racial bias.

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