Research

Published Research
Research in Social Psychology

Gender Differences in Law School Classroom Participation: The Key Role of Social Context

Authors: Sophie Trawalter, Molly Bishop Shadel, J.H. Verkerke

Even though women make up roughly half of the students enrolled in law school today, they do not take up roughly half of the speaking time in law school classes. We found that women, more than men, report backlash for speaking in class, and this difference affects their willingness to participate in the law school classroom.

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Published Research
Education Research and Policy

Unfinished Business? Academic and Labor Market Profile of Adults With Substantial College Credits But No Degree

Authors: Benjamin Castleman, Kelli Bird, Brett Fischer, Benjamin T. Skinner

Using data from the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), this case provides the first detailed profile on the academic, employment, and earnings trajectories of the SCND population and how these compare with VCCS graduates. The scholars show that the share of SCND students who are academically ready to re-enroll and would benefit from doing so may be substantially lower than policy makers anticipate.

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Published Research

Racial Bias in Perceptions of Disease and Policy

Authors: Sophie Trawalter, Nana-Bilkisu Habib, James N. Druckman

Narratives about Africa as dark, depraved, and diseased justified the exploitation of African land and people. Today, these narratives may still have a hold on people’s fears about disease. This group of scholars conducts tests and studies that, when taken together, make clear that reactions to pandemics are biased, and in a way consistent with historical narratives about race and Africa.

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Published Research

Are Americans less likely to reply to emails from Black people relative to White people?

Authors: John Holbein, Ray Block, Jr., Charles Crabtree, J. Quin Monson

Although previous attempts have been made to measure everyday discrimination against African Americans, these approaches have been constrained by distinct methodological challenges. We present the results from an audit or correspondence study of a large-scale, nationally representative pool of the American public. We provide evidence that in simple day-to-day interactions, such as sending and responding to emails, the public discriminates against Black people. 

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Published Research
Research in Social Psychology

Anger Damns the Innocent

Authors: Gabrielle Adams, Katherine A. DeCelles, Holly S. Howe, Leslie K. John

False accusations permeate social life—from the mundane blaming of other people to more serious accusations of infidelity and workplace wrongdoing. Importantly, false accusations can have grave consequences, including broken relationships, job loss, and reputational damage.  In this article, we document an equally pernicious phenomenon—the misuse of anger as a cue to predict whether a suspect has been falsely accused.

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